Bad Breath or "Doggy Breath"

Dental care   Causes   Natural remedies   Complementary care

Though we often take it for granted that dogs and cats have bad breath, it is not generally considered "normal" in a healthy pet and could be the sign of an underlying health condition. Halitosis describes something more than the lingering scent after your cat has enjoyed salmon for dinner; it refers to consistently bad breath that is marked by a particularly foul and offensive odor.

Dental Care

First and foremost, removal of the plaque and tartar with dental cleansing is going to remove the bateria that contribute to odor. Follow-up with regular dental care. And then add the homeopathics and vitamins below to reduce bad breath from internal sources.

Causes of "Doggy Breath" in Dogs and Cats

Halitosis is often caused by the bacteria that works to digest any food particles remaining your pet's mouth after he eats. It can also be caused by bacterial infections surrounding the bases of your pet's teeth. Good dental health is key to managing bad breath symptoms.

Specific causes of "doggy breath" include: the build up of tartar, which can lead to gingivitis and periodontitis; abscesses; and foreign bodies stuck in the mouth (hair, bone, wood, etc).

There is a relationship between liver and kidney diseases and pets' halitosis. Often infections of the major organs can be caused by bacteria that has entered an animal's system through his mouth when he suffers from the dental issues that cause bad breath. In cats, there can also be a link between halitosis and both feline leukemia and feline immunodeficiency disease (feline AIDS).

Puppies and kittens can briefly suffer from halitosis as their "baby" teeth fall out and their adult teeth come in, but this is not generally a sign of any health problems.

Holistic Remedies

It has been our experience that natural remedies for bad breath in pets have been extremely useful. See the suggestions in the sidebar.